WATER, WASTEWATER & SEWER


TOM MOLSKI,image coming soon - Copy

Department of Public Works Working Foreman
Wastewater Treatment Plant Supervisor


1000 W Cedar Ave
Gladwin MI 48624
Phone: (989) 426-6943

Fax: (989) 426-6942

E-mail the DPW Foreman/ WWTP Supervisor

STAFF
Joe Zeitz, Head Water Department Operator

Mike Welke, Assistant DPW Working Foreman
Nate Carman
Justin Thorington
John Kern
Andrew Reville

THE DPW PERFORMS THE FOLLOWING FUNCTIONS:

  • Brush and Leaf collection/removal
  • Snow removal from city streets
  • Sewer maintenance and cleaning
  • Burials and maintenance of Highland Cemetery
  • Maintenance of city buildings
  • Street sweeping
  • Road patching

ADDITIONALLY, THE DPW OPERATES AND MAINTAINS THE CITY'S DRINKING WATER & WASTEWATER SYSTEMS

DRINKING WATER
tower
Groundwater is the source of The City of Gladwin’s drinking water supply. Water is pumped from the underground aquifer, through the Iron Removal Plant, and into the water tower where it is ready for distribution. The Iron Removal Plant, maintained and operated by the DPW, effectively eliminates roughly 95% of the iron in the city’s drinking water via a sand filtration system. The water is treated with chlorine and phosphate before being sent into the distribution system. The treated drinking water and raw well water are regularly tested for several Water Quality Parameters as required by permit. Maintenance of the water distribution system by the DPW includes regular flushing of water mains, repairing and fixing leaks, replacing old or broken water meters, and maintenance of valves and fire hydrants. Click HERE to read/view a copy of the Water Quality Report.

WASTEWATER
The City of Gladwin Wastewater Treatment System consists of a mechanical plant followed by two aerated lagoons. Removal of coarse materials, like sand and dirt, and the bulk of the biosolids is accomplished through various mechanical and physical processes at the Wastewater Treatment Plant. The removed biosolids undergo biological treatment in anaerobic digesters where pathogens are reduced sufficiently to be land applied to farmland roughly once every two years. The partially treated wastewater from the mechanical plant is then pumped to the aerated lagoons where it receives further treatment by microorganisms which break down wastes and pollutants biologically. The final effluent is then treated with chlorine to kill pathogens before being discharged into the Cedar River. During the summer months, the final effluent is spray irrigated onto cropland owned by the city.